Insertion of a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)
Medicine is usually the first treatment option for arrhythmia, a condition in which the heart beats too fast, too slow or with an irregular rhythm. If medication does not work, a surgeon may implant a pacemaker under the skin of the chest or abdomen, with wires that connect it to the heart chambers. The device uses electrical pulses to control the heart rhythm when a sensor detects that it is abnormal. An ICD works similarly, but it sends an electric shock to restore a normal rhythm when it detects a dangerous arrhythmia.
FAQ
"There is about a 1-2% risk of stroke, heart attack, death, damage to the heart or lungs requiring surgery, including puncturing the heart but this risk may vary based on the patient's condition. There is a risk of bleeding and bruising, damage to the artery, nerves, and veins requiring surgery or transfusions, blood clots and swelling and infection. There is also a risk of pneumothorax, a condition in which air becomes trapped in the pleural space, causing the lung to collapse. There is about a 5% chance of the lead dislodging requiring reoperation. There is about a 1% risk of failure of the device before the usual 4-7 year replacement duration. For about 4 weeks it is important to avoid lifting the arm on the side of the ICD above the level of the shoulder to decrease the risk of dislodging the leads. There is a risk of damage to the lead so repetitive motion on the side of the ICD should be avoided long-term. If patient is pregnant or suspect pregnancy, they should notify their doctor. If lactating, or breastfeeding, they should notify their doctor. Patients who are allergic to or sensitive to medications or latex should notify their doctor."
"Avoid activities that involve heavy lifting or rough contact that could result in blows to your implant site and to allow your incision time to heal. Carry your Medical Device ID Card with you at all times."
 Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are small devices that deliver energy to the heart through thin, flexible wires called leads.They are implanted beneath the skin, below the collarbone
 Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are small devices that deliver energy to the heart through thin, flexible wires called leads.They are implanted beneath the skin, below the collarbone

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